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Perennial Plant of the year 1999

Parsley 

L.O. Excellence Awards 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society’s Gold Medal Plant Award  

A Summer Bulb Primer 

100 Best Plants
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Perennial Plant of the Year
1999

Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’

In 1937 Heinrich Hagemann observed a glorious stand of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullvantii at Gebrueder Schuetz’s nursery in the Rudbeckia Czech Republic. Recognizing the superiority over other commonly-grown Rudbeckia species, Hagemann convinced his employer Karl Foerster of Potsdam, Germany to propagate his discovery. World War II interfered with the planned debut of the plant and it was not until 1949 that the triumphant success of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullvantii renamed ‘Goldsturm’ began. ‘Goldsturm’ translates to English as "gold storm"

A member of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family, orange coneflower or black-eyed Susan has a native range from New Jersey west to Illinois. ‘Goldsturm’ orange coneflower is significant in its compact habit and 1-2 inch golden-yellow petals which encircle a nearly black cone of disk flowers. The leaves are coarse, dark green lanceolate to ovate, 3-6 inches long; stem leaves are smaller, almost bract-like. The "gold storm" blankets the tops of 18-30 inch tall plants from mid-July to October. Plant width is 24 inches.

Propagation

This excellent composite can be propagated by seed, division, or stem cuttings. Height and colour uniformity

can vary in plants grown from seed compared to asexually propagated plants. Germination guidelines prescribed moist chilling for 3-4 weeks at 32-35 degrees F. followed by 72 degrees F. germination temperature. Research at The Ohio State University reported an optimal germination temperature for untreated seeds to be 82 degrees F to 88 degrees F. Seedlings are transplanted 28-38 days after sowing. Clump division is done early spring or fall with spring preferred. Stem cuttings are taken as the stem tissue begins to harden.

Cultivation

‘Goldsturm’ is a long-blooming, low maintenance, long-lived perennial for full sun to partial shade. It tolerates clay soils and mild droughts, but grows best in well-drained, consistently moist soil. ‘Goldsturm’ orange coneflower performs as well in the high heat and humid of South Carolina as it does in the -35 degrees F winters of Alberta. Plant bare-root or container-grown plants anytime during the growing season, 18 inches apart. When establishing a new planting, mulch to retain moisture. ‘Goldsturm’ has few pest or disease problems. Continued on Page 2

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