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Canadian Certified
Horticultural
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BRUCE

ZIMMERMAN

Host of 

the

BRUCE

ZIMMERMAN

Host of 

the

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Canadian Certified Horticultural Technician

In November of 1997, 42CCHT Logo garden centre personnel were tested for the Canadian Nursery Trades Association’s (CNTA) Canadian Certified Horticultural Technician (CCHT) National Retail Garden Centre Certification test. The programme has great merit because the participant must complete the 3 hour written test, passing all sections and pass all practical stations. The passing grade is 70%. It will give the employee a real sense of accomplishment. It will also give others in the garden centre a skill knowledge level for which they can strive. In other words, the test is not a gift and you need to know your stuff to be certified as a “Certified Horticultural Technician.” There are now more than 10 garden centre employees that have successfully completed the CCHT test in Ontario. Bruce Zimmerman is one of the more than 10 that are certified. 

The sections of the 3 hour test are:

Plant sensitivity
General Comprehension
Plant I.D. - Matching
Plant I.D. - Use & Maintenance
Plant I.D. & Control
Plant Grading & Handling
Equipment / Facility / Safety
Display & Customer Service 

The practical testing stations are:

Plant I.D.
Fertilizer / Applications
Pesticides / Applications
Merchandising & Display
Customer Etiquette 
Tree Planting
Phone Etiquette
Cash Handling
Pruning
Plant Handling & Grading

Cultivation Continued from page 1

Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’ is easy to grow and has a long bloom season; plants often remain in bloom for up to 6 weeks. Bare-root or containerized plants should be planted in partial to full sun. Magnus purple cornflower is well adapted to dry sites and good drainage in the winter is recommended. Purple coneflower grows well in soils with organic matter mixed in the top 6-8 inches at planting time. Bare-root plants or divisions should be planted so the emerging buds are just below the soil surface. Purple coneflower is slow to start in the spring, but grows rapidly with the onset of hot summer weather. ‘Magnus’ is bothered by few insect pests. Purple coneflower is frequented by butterflies and birds.
Source: Perennial Plant Association

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