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1998 Fall
Gardening 
Style & Colour
Trends

New Introductions

Fragrant Spring Flowering Bulbs

Some of the Hybrid& Botanical Tulips
that Naturalize Well

Heritage Perennials
Perennial Gardening 
Guide 

All-American Selections1999
Winners

BRUCE

ZIMMERMAN

Host of 

  the

BRUCE

ZIMMERMAN

Host of 

the

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 Fall GardeningTrends Style & Colour
1998

 New trends are emerging in Canadian gardens, as evidenced by what’s “hot” in flower bulb sales this fall:

Anything in brighter, richer colours -- previous excitement was over pastels
Anything orange!
Anything small (botanical tulips, mini-daffodils, etc.) Good for today’s smaller gardens
Anything fragrant
Anything unusual or ‘different’

Gardeners who swooned for pastel tulips in recent years are now clamouring for blooms in ‘jewel-tones’. People still love the pastels -- but now want to “fall in love with” punchier colours too. Biggest sellers are bulb flowers in rich, clear shades such as: ruby, amethyst, sapphire and diamond.

Tips on the “Psychology of Colour”

The colour wheel divides colours into two main groups: “warm colours” (such as reds and yellows) and “cool colours” (such as blues and greens).
The farther apart from each other colours are on the wheel, the more contrast there is between them. Colours positioned directly opposite one another on the wheel have the most contrast. These are called “complementary colours”. Complementary pairings are brilliant, intense and eye catching
Blue paired with orange would be an example.

.The colour yellow is the first colour people look at. Use yellow tulips or daffodils in those areas of the garden to which you want to draw attention.
Blue flowers, such as hyacinths or grape hyacinths (muscari), planted along the sides of a garden can increase the appearance of depth, making the garden look larger.
Tulips come in just about every colour except black. Although some tulips come in such a deep, rich purple that they actually appear to be black.

Tulip Colour Preferences by Personality Type

The colours we choose for our clothes, our car, the paint for our home or the flowers in our garden, make a statement about who we are.

The Type A Personality likes the “hot” colours--intense yellows, reds, purples and bi-colours. The Type A wants it all: everything under the sun, with lots of things going on, all at once. Intense colour mixes prevail: red with orange, pink, purple, fuchsia and white. Helpful hint: Type A’s prone to stressful over-doing might benefit from planting the Blue paired with orange would be an example.

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