GREENNOTES

WHAT'S INSIDE

All-America Rose Selections Award Winners 2002 
American Hosta Growers Association Hosta of the Year Selections
Great Performers
 Special Bulbs
Plant Profile 
All-America Selection Award Winners 2002 
 Great Performers
 Special Bulbs continued
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Great Performers

The Best of the Best: ‘Special Bulbs’

Allium sphaerocephalon

 
Allium Drumsticks

Better known as drumstick alliums these reddish-purple fuzz balls atop slender 24-inch stems bring a dramatic or whimsical touch to borders, perennial beds or grassland plantings. They naturalize easily, making for fun mass plantings. They bloom May-June, thrive in full sun, and make great companions for perennials such as hostas, Alchemilla mollis (lady’s mantle) or ornamental grasses. Don’t deadhead them. They make extremely decorative dried flowers. Native to Europe, North Africa and West Asia, they are resistant to deer and rodents, suited to a variety of climates and hardy in USDA Zones 5-8.

Anemone blanda

 
Anemone Blanda Mixed Also known as Grecian windflowers, these low-growing (6-inches) early bloomers with long-lasting daisy-like flowers come in white, pink or purplish-blue. Plant in single colour blocks for waves of unbroken colour — or select mixed colour packages for a crazy quilt look. Planted enmasse they make a fabulous groundcover and are equally at home in the rock garden, in perennial beds and in garden borders. They can also be used with success in container plantings. Another excellent use is as the "lower level" in double-decker plantings where the anemone’s daisy-like flowers add a twinkle-y touch beneath taller daffodils or tulips. They like full sun, but can tolerate partial shade and need a well-drained spot, preferably where the soil is dry on top but moist underneath. They bloom in March-April and are hardy in USDA Zones 4-7.

Chionodoxa forbesii (syn. Lucillae) – Commonly called glory of the snow, C. forbesii is now the official name though it is still found under its former name
C. Lucillae
. One of the first flowers of spring,

 this delicate six-inch tall bulb flower blooms in  February-March and is a native of Western Turkey. Its elegant, rich blue flowers with white centers are borne four to 12 florets per stem. Preferring full sun, but tolerant of partial shade, this flower excels in the rock garden, border, under trees and shrubs. Chionodoxa naturalizes with ease, is resistant to deer and rodents, and hardy in USDA Zones 3-8.

Galanthus nivalis

 
Snowdrops

 Better known as the snowdrop, this is one of spring’s first sentinels, flowering in February-March, sometimes blooming right through the snow. Galanthus have 10-inch stems topped by dainty, nodding white flowers with a green spot at the apex of each petal. Galanthus look best naturalized in clusters in a lawn or woodland. They flower so early that lawn plantings are not an issue – it’s too early to mow as grass is generally dormant then. This means galanthus-in-the-grass can easily be left to die back for six weeks (the necessary die-back time for naturalized bulbs to recharge their stored energy for next years’ bloom season). Plant galanthus in rock gardens, gardens, under shrubs and in sweeps across the lawn. It is resistant to deer and rodents, likes full sun to partial shade and is hardy in USDA Zones 4-7. Note: full sun is plentiful in early spring – before deciduous trees have leafed out. Also keep an eye out for the double flowering Snowdrops.

Hyacinthoides hispanica – Also known as Scilla Hispanica, Endymion hispanicus, Scilla campanulata, Spanish bluebell and wood hyacinth. (In cultivation in Holland since 1601, they’ve had time to pick up a "handle or two!)
With tall stems (12-16 inches) to support its abundant, pendulous bell-shaped flowers, this is actually the tallest of the scilla-type flowers. It is available in light and dark blue, white, and pink and is often offered in mixed color assortments. This easy naturalizer is
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